Growing Food Project: local, fair and sustainable



Most of us living in congested cities feel disconnected to where our food comes from. Shopping at supermarkets and relying on food that comes from far away contributes to unethical consumptions, unequal distributions and ecological damage. What if food is closer to us and we become more involved in the way it is produced, shared and distributed?

 

Growing food is the simplest, yet most important step to reconnect – to look after our health, our environment and build healthier communities.

 

Artist and nutritionist Rasha Tayeh spent the last 12 months documenting stories from Melbourne’s local food movement. Inspired by her local community and Patrick Jones’ poetry, Rasha has since written and directed the Growing Food Project – a short film that beautifully weaves together imagery, poetry and music with stories from inspiring food activists taking positive steps to re-localise our food system. The film explores grass-roots initiatives aiming to build sustainable food systems and offer connections to our food — where it comes from, how we eat it, who we share it with and how we waste it.

 

There is a growing energy in Melbourne responding to food and sustainability issues. Local communities are teaming up to strengthen the way we produce and distribute local food. From community gardening to neighbourhood feasts, ‘these community food projects improve the way we eat, reconnect us with nature, build relationships between neighbours and enhance our food culture,’ says director, Rasha Tayeh.

 

Film is a powerful medium for raising awareness; it captures the imagination, inspires viewers and triggers change.  The Growing Food Project invites viewers to contemplate the social, economic and political benefits of supporting local food systems.  Rasha hopes this film ‘inspires a more critical conversation about our industrialised food system and a call for action towards a decentralized, more resilient alternative’. Growing food in the city and building productive gardens can help us take positive steps to address food security, public health and climate change.

 

Growing Food Project will be screened on Saturday 30th November 2013.  For more info click here.
This film screening will be followed by a panel discussion with artist and nutritionist, Rasha Tayeh alongside other inspiring designers and architects discussing Food and the Built Environment – inviting viewers to discuss the benefits of supporting local food systems and how we can better design cities around food and bring it closer to us.

 

Panel speakers include:

 

Rasha Tayeh – Nutritionist, artist, Growing Food Project film director

Kate Dundas – Landscape architect, urban designer at Planisphere

Justin Hutchinson – Industrial designer, director at JHD & Urban Commons

Michael Trudgeon – Architect, industrial designer, deputy director at Victorian Eco Innovation Lab

 

The film screening & panel discussion will kick off at the Clemenger BBDO Auditorium (NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road Melbourne) at 3pm and will be followed by a tour of the Foodscape designed by Urban Commons at the NGV Garden.

 

This event is Free.

 

For more information about the Growing Food Project visit:

www.growingfoodproject.org

www.facebook.com/growingfoodproject.shortfilm

 

Images © Growing Food project, Courtesy: Rasha Tayeh

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